Make Mine Music [VHS]

Pinned on September 2, 2013 at 7:51 am by John Villarreal

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Make Mine Music [VHS]

Share in Walt Disney’s extraordinary vision of pairing imaginative stories with spectacular music in Disney’s 8th full-length animated classic, available for the first time ever. In the tradition of FANTASIA, MAKE MINE MUSIC is a glorious collection of musically charged animated shorts featuring such fun-filled favorites as “Peter And The Wolf,” narrated by the beloved voice behind Winnie The Pooh. In addition, you’ll enjoy such classic cartoon hits as “Casey At The Bat,” “The Whale Who Wanted To Sing At The Met,” and “Johnnie Fedora And Alice Bluebonnet,” the whimsical adventure of two hats who fall in love in a department store window. Every member of your family will have a favorite in this musical medley of fun and fantasy from Disney!Sometimes referred to as “the Poor Man’s Fantasia,” Make Mine Music (1946) was the first of the “package features” Walt Disney released after World War II. Instead of Bach and Beethoven, the artists illustrated segments set to popular music by Benny Goodman, Dinah Shore, and the Andrews Sisters. Originally set to Debussy’s “Claire de Lune,” “Blue Bayou” remains an atmospheric evocation of the Everglades. “The Whale Who Wanted to Sing at the Met” is a charming fantasy about a cetacean with an extraordinary voice. “Peter and the Wolf,” based on the Prokofiev score, offers brightly colored designs, but the narration by Sterling Holloway seems superfluous. “All the Cats Join In” is an upbeat evocation of the Bobby Sox era, but “Casey at the Bat” and “Johnny Fedora and Alice Bluebonnet” feel self-conscious and unfunny.

“Two Silhouettes” combines rotoscoped images of Ballets Russes de Monte Carlo stars Tatiana Riabouchinska and David Lichine with kitsch cupids, sparkles, and hearts. “The Martins and the Coys,” a spoof of a hillbilly feud, has been excised in a bow to modern taste. The supplemental material includes The Band Concert, the first color Mickey Mouse short and one of the character’s finest performances, and Music Land, a quirky Silly Symphony about clashing musical styles. –Charles Solomon


Comments

J. Ewaniuk says:

Disney Has Done It Again When FANTASIA was released on home video in 1991, there was a clip missing (also from recent theatrical releases) becauses it was deemed offensive to today’s audiences. When ALADDIN was released to home video, pressure groups insisted some lyrics of the opening song be changed from the theatrical release (of course they weren’t changed on the soundtrack CD which came with the “special edition” video release). When MELODY TIME was first released to home video in 1998, the cigarette dangling from the mouth of the character Pecos Bill was edited out (evidently Disney villains can smoke, but not the hero). When THE LITTLE MERMAID was re-released to home video in 1998, the advertising said Fully Restored – but the closing credits were pushed to one side to make room for a “music video” and the song was not even the original song accompanying those end credits – this is restored?

Zack Davisson says:

Great early Disney with disappointing edits I am both happy and disappointed with “Make Mine Music.” Happy, because it contains some fantastic theatrical-quality short cartoons in DVD quality. “Peter and the Wolf” has always been a favorite of mine since the days of “Wonderful World of Disney.” The funny and sad tale of “The Whale Who Wanted to Sing at the Met” is still great (Love that version of Mephisto). “Casey at the Bat” is a familiar classic. My personal favorite for this release is “All the Cats Join In.” It has great animation and a swinging tune.

Shanda Hoover says:

Just say no to this abridged version As tacky and unnecessary as putting boxer shorts on the statue of David is Disney’s over-zealous insistence on self-censorship. Cutting out segments of classic movies (or refraining from releasing them at all) in an effort to adhere to a perceived standard of “political correctness” is absolutely offensive to this viewer. It paves the way down a slippery slope of censorship. As much as I desire to have the 8th animated feature film produced by Disney in my collection I will refrain until they release the orignal, completely intact movie. Until then Disney should be advised to clearly label all censored movies as “ABRIDGED”, to do otherwise is deceitful.


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