Flex

Pinned on September 2, 2013 at 7:54 am by Sandra Mackenzie

Repin
Flex

Flex instructs, informs and inspires with cutting edge training and nutrition for the professional and amateur bodybuilder. Flex is for the reader who wants to be the biggest guy in the gym and is a fan of and active participant in bodybuilding competitions.


Comments

Anonymous says:

Been a avid flex reader for years. I love convience of reading on my kindle high quality images no more stock piling magazines in my closet. I prefer flex over muscle and fitness way to many ads compared to flex and yes flex does have alot of ads. But still has great articles to read and im going to enjoy downloading flex on my kindle for along time

Anonymous says:

I was a long-time Flex subscriber, probably had them for about 5 years from 2000-2005 or so. Well after seeing they were available on the Kindle Fire, I figured what the heck, I’d try ’em out again. In some ways they put a lot of effort into it, so I’ll give ’em kudos for that. The articles are lengthily written so there’s a lot of content, but personally I also thought it was overkill sometimes. But that’s not why I’m giving them a poor rating. The poor rating is two-fold:1) Ads. It’s always been ad-heavy, but in a digital format it’s so annoying to have 1 article for every 5+ pages of ads (and that really is the ratio, at least in the issue I downloaded, December 2012).2) Workout Sections are poorly laid out. I get that Flex has always been big on the overall “body-building” community, and that’s pretty cool. Many of the guys seem like great people. Maybe it’s just the issue I got, but the workout routines were added in poorly and seemed like an afterthought. Sure, you can read a two-page monologue about squats, but dumb it down a little, show some freaking pictures with proper technique as well! Isn’t that why we’re reading a magazine in the first place (since they often encourage different techniques even for common exercies)? Not to mention the content that was there in absurd amounts? Supplement talk. And again, that’s always been a big part of body-building, I get that, but it’s not exactly making the image of the sport look good when a leading body-building mag has almost no exercise routines and at least a dozen different supplement articles (and of course, the insane amount of supplement ads, half of which you can’t tell from the actual magazine articles).Like I said, they put a lot of effort into it, and it worked fairly well on Kindle Fire (some sections had a clickable part that then popped out and was actually formated for the Fire, so that was kinda cool). But, the ads, oh-my-god the ads!


Write a comment